8/3 Roster move: Atkins up, Schlitter to Iowa

The Cubs called up reinforcements for the bullpen, adding Mitch Atkins and sending Brian Schlitter to Triple-A Iowa. This is Atkins’ third stint with the Cubs. In 22 appearances with Iowa, he was 6-2 with a 3.49 ERA. In12 relief appearances, he was 2-1 with a 2.82 ERA. Schlitter was 0-1 with a 12.38 ERA in seven relief appearances with the Cubs, giving up 11 earned runs over eight innings.

– Carrie Muskat

10 Comments

Yes because Atkins has been stellar so far with the Cubs…

Can anybody on this blog name a pitcher aside from Silva that Rothschild has improved after being added to the roster?

He is held in high regard by his peers but for what?

Carrie can you list Larry’s strengths please?

Carrie – thanks for that it puts some perspective.

I just cannot see why as an organisation we have had to throw all these guys before they are ready.

My issue with Larry is that when these guys come up from the minors, he must be advising Hendry who has adequate tools? If not, I would question why not… When they get here they are sent up and down using up their options without ever learning… Cashner, Schlitter, Atkins, Berg, Russell and Stevens should be arriving with the artillery or not at all. And as our pitching guru, Larry should be arming their artillery.

The bullpen was an issue coming out of Spring Training and all we did was sign up Bob Howry… admittedly Guzman and Caridad’s issues haven’t helped, but how do Seattle have the lights out pair of Aardsma and League and Toronto their multiple options in the pen on a shoestring whilst we have a huge payroll and kids with Learner plates on?

On the subject of Marmol, yes his Ks are impressive, but his control is woeful. The recent White Sox and Phillies games for me showed why he is a st up man, NOT, a closer… unless Larry can work a few wonders.

Randy Wells doesn’t win 12 games his rookie season if not for Rothschild. The Cubs got more out of Rich Harden because of him as well. Ted Lilly won a career-high 17 games last year. As much as I like watching the kids pitch/play, they aren’t ready for the big leagues. Cashner, Russell, Berg, etc. don’t have a second pitch and for sure, don’t have a third one, which means hitters are sitting on fastballs. That’s not Rothschild’s fault. The Cubs have called these kids up out of necessity and fans have to be patient. I talk to Rothschild quite a bit — and the pitchers, too. He’s very highly regarded. Here’s some other numbers to think about: this year, Cubs starting pitchers have posted 63 quality starts, third in the NL and fifth in the Majors. Yet, as a team, they have 46 wins. There should be more W’s.

Randy Wells would have won 15 or possibly more if he had any kind of an offense supporting him last year. Also I would argue Rothschild has worked wonders on Marmol (16.78 K/9)and Marshall (1.10 WHIP).

Carrie – thanks for that it puts some perspective.

I just cannot see why as an organisation we have had to throw all these guys before they are ready.

My issue with Larry is that when these guys come up from the minors, he must be advising Hendry who has adequate tools? If not, I would question why not… When they get here they are sent up and down using up their options without ever learning… Cashner, Schlitter, Atkins, Berg, Russell and Stevens should be arriving with the artillery or not at all. And as our pitching guru, Larry should be arming their artillery.

The bullpen was an issue coming out of Spring Training and all we did was sign up Bob Howry… admittedly Guzman and Caridad’s issues haven’t helped, but how do Seattle have the lights out pair of Aardsma and League and Toronto their multiple options in the pen on a shoestring whilst we have a huge payroll and kids with Learner plates on?

On the subject of Marmol, yes his Ks are impressive, but his control is woeful. The recent White Sox and Phillies games for me showed why he is a st up man, NOT, a closer… unless Larry can work a few wonders.

Regards Marshall… easily my favourite present Cub. A nice guy who just gets on with his job with no pouting. It would be great if he could start, but he is too valuable as the LH set up guy.

Seattle has Aardsma because way back when Hendry acquired him he didn’t turn into Cy Young so he traded him to the WhiteSox for Karchner (I think) and then lo and behold HE didn’t turn out to be Cy Young either but he had even a worse down side than Aardsma. Long story short, Seattle winds up with Aardsma because Hendry saw no value or potential in him just like Milwaukee wound up with McGhee. Although Rothschild may have worn out his welcome I agree with Carrie that there is not much he can do with kids that are not physically or mentally ready for the bigs and I would much rather give Rothschild a chance under a new GM than blame the bullpen issues on him, ONLY Hendry needs to take (ACCEPT) the blame for the bullpen. Rothschild may be limited to either guessing who may be ready or suggesting the lesser of all evils. All this talk points to getting rid of Hendry.

So looking through the rest of the majors who else has Hendry released (or almost given away in a trade) that is shining elsewhere…?

Let’s start with:

Angel Pagan
Casey McGehee
David Aardsma – traded for the mighty Neil Cotts!!!

And how much better would we have been with a competent GM…?

Neil Cotts! That’s right, my mistake for thinking of Matt Karchner. Thanks for the correction hustle. Even a worse move? Who did we “give away” for Karchner then?
Did anybody read Whitmeyer’s article in the Times today? He referred to this year as a “comeback” year for Soriano and that us fans are not as steamed at the 8 year deal anymore. I don’t think so. All an over-rated, over-paid, under-performing player has to do is have a MISERABLE year, then return the following year with a not as bad MISERABLE year to be considered a comeback and have his terrible contract justified? Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. This is the menatlity of being satisfied with either the status quo or even worse than status quo which continues Hendry’s damaging the team’s chances of a World Series.

Let’s be honest, Soriano is going nowhere, so we will have to continue to support him.

This year has been an improvement – on last year. We are never going to get 35HR and 100+RBIs out of him, but if he can go 25HR and 85RBI we will have to smile and grind our teeth.

We are stuck with him – so make the best of a bad situation.

hustlelikereed, you are correct yet again sir/madam. What the Cubs hopefully will have in place next year is a manager that will maximize what’s left of Soriano and by that I mean routinely limiting his exposure in left field after the sixth inning in games we have a lead. If he plays beyond the sixth inning because the manager is hoping to get one of his sporadic homeruns we are in trouble. Even in tied games when a homerun can win it late would we really still COUNT on Soriano being THAT player to win the game? I think those days are long gone and if we need a run to win or tie a game late we would be better off with a manager that can CREATE that run using competant hitters and base runners including Soriano’s left field, late inning replacement. Soriano, Zambrano and probably Fukodome are here for a while longer, it’s now up to the manager to minimze these 3 Hendry BLUNDERS by limiting their playing time to certain roles.

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