9/20 Soriano’s 30/100 season

Alfonso Soriano hit his 30th home run on Wednesday, and now is the fifth Cubs player age 36 or older to reach 30 home runs and 100 RBIs in a season, joining Hank Sauer, Andre Dawson, Fred McGriff, and Moises Alou. Nothing was going to stop Soriano’s home run, which came with two outs in the sixth off the Reds’ Mike Leake.

“He did it in style,” Dale Sveum said. “The ball wasn’t walking out of there. I think that was going out regardless of wind.”

This is the sixth time in Soriano’s career and second season with the Cubs he has reached 30. The elder statesman on the team also is the second player in MLB history to reach 30 home runs despite not hitting any in his first 30 games. Soriano’s first blast came May 15 in his 31st game. Dwight Evans hit 32 home runs in 1982 for the Red Sox, but didn’t hit his first that season until his 39th game. Soriano, 36, has 103 RBIs, one shy of his career high of 104 set in 2005 with the Rangers.

“I’m proud of myself, I’ve been working hard,” Soriano said. “I always say, if I’m healthy, the numbers will be there. We came up short tonight.”

He was on deck in the 11th when rookie Anthony Rizzo struck out swinging to end the game, and Soriano slammed his bat to the ground in disgust.

“It’s always very sad to see us lose a game, especially after we come back,” Soriano said. “I get a little frustrated because I wanted to win that game because we lost the last two games in a row.”

– Carrie Muskat

6 Comments

joey your crow is served… hows it taste?

grats fonzie. keep it up.

Beisbol been bery, bery good to him

Best season in a Cubs uniform. Hope you can stretch that into next year.

Chico, I would like to see that also as I don’t believe the Cubs are going to be able to trade Sorry.

Mamma, I think his low ba and his STILL suspect (although improved) defense, his lack of plate discipline and his weak outfield instincts will have Soriano be remembered as one of the most ill-advised free agent signings not only for the inept Hendry but for the Cubs’ organization. The return value for the purchase price is practically zip….unless, of course one thinks his AWESOME clubhouse presence, work ethics and taking Castro under his wing (which is VERY worrisome) is worth 130 mil? I’ve already noticed on numerous occassions how Castro does not run FULL OUT
to first base on routine ground balls, rather he assumes the out will be made…hmmm…HIS legs are not old and withered yet…wonder what keeps him from running hard, putting more pressure on the infielders to make the play quicker? Oh! I think it’s INFLUENCE. Soriano’s greatest accomplishment this year (besides fooling people into thinking he is a GOLD GLOVE CONTENDER HA!) is to prove his run production is still very much in play…for a no pressure, non-contending ball club on which he can shine.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 254 other followers

%d bloggers like this: