8/11 Brewers 3, Cubs 1

* Jake Arrieta gave up two runs on five hits over 7 1/3 innings and took the loss. Despite the loss, he has a 1.94 ERA and 48 strikeouts in eight starts at Wrigley Field. This was his 11th quality start out of his last 12.

* Chris Coghlan tied the game with an RBI double in the fifth. After batting .202 in the first 44 games, he’s batting .354 in the last 36.

* Javier Baez doubled in the fourth, and extended his hitting streak to five games. This was his seventh big league game.

* Starlin Castro extended his hitting streak to a season-high 10 games with a single in the second. He has 131 hits, most among NL shortstops.

* Yovani Gallardo picked up the win, and Mark Reynolds hit a solo home run for the Brewers.

9 Comments

Carrie, Cubs fans: A rules question (not related to this game): I get SportsCenter on satellite TV here. A highlight from last week, don’t recall which game: The catcher catches a pitch, stands up, takes a couple of steps toward the mound, and lobs the ball back to the pitcher. And then the guy on third base runs in behind the catcher and steals home! Isn’t the ball dead on the toss back to the pitcher? Sometimes even the umpire throws the ball back to the mound. What’s the rule? Thanks.

You have to be pretty fast to steal home like that, but I do believe that it is a legal play. As for the umpire throwing the ball back to the pitcher, they usually only do that when a new ball is put into the game, in which case the play is dead. This mostly happens on a foul ball in the stands and it’s the ump’s choice whether to throw the new ball to the pitcher himself or hand it to the catcher to throw. It can also happen on a pitch in the dirt. Usually, when the catcher has secured the ball and it’s clear the runner(s) is not trying to advance, the ump will call time and the old ball will be tossed aside and a new ball put into the game. I’m guessing here, that in the case of a new ball being put into the game, the umpire will signal the play live by giving the pitcher the ready to play point after the pitcher has received the new ball.

If I may, Bruce, from what you describe, the runner absolutely is free to attempt the steal of home in that situation. There is no time out unless someone asked for it, and there was no indication of that from what you describe.

I’m going to give it a shot and call it a live ball, it never came in contact with an umpire and the catcher is a player on in the filed of play and can do what he thinks is best as a defensive player with the live ball such as throwing it back to the pitcher or throwing to the third baseman in an attempt to pick off the runner. Sounds like a heads up play by the base runner, a delayed steal.

It is a legal play. Delayed steal

Be careful whom you label as elderly, CT. I`m much older than that dude, and I`m not elderly; not even close. Do you follow my meaning?

Has anyone noticed the terrible slump Anthony Rizzo has been in since the All-Star game? He hasn’t hit a homer in a month and strikes out more often than not.

I`m unhappy with the entire lineup`s dysfunction offensively. You all can generate just one run in a nine inning game? Please! That`s lame. Arrieta has grounds to sue the position players for non-support.

I would put off any legal action until a roster resembling a ML ball club is assembled. Hopefully sometime next season.

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