Results tagged ‘ Milton Bradley ’

9/17 Bradley out with sore knee

Milton Bradley took himself out of Thursday’s game against the Milwaukee Brewers because of left knee inflammation.

The Cubs outfielder was hit by a pitch in the first, popped up to lead off the fourth, and singled to open the sixth. Bradley said something to Cubs first base coach Matt Sinatro, then headed for the dugout. Bobby Scales took over as a pinch-runner.  

The Cubs are short-handed as far as outfielders on the roster, adding 40-year-old So Taguchi on Wednesday. He had played for Triple-A Iowa, and was sitting at home when he got the call. Alfonso Soriano underwent arthroscopic surgery on his left knee Tuesday, Reed Johnson was still sidelined with a fractured left foot, and Sam Fuld is out because of a strained right thumb.

– Carrie Muskat

9/16 Lineup

With a win Wednesday over the Brewers, the Cubs would be eight games over .500 for the first time since Aug. 8 when they were 58-50. Here’s the lineup:

SS Theriot

CF Fukudome

1B Lee

3B Ramirez

C Soto

RF Bradley

2B Fontenot

LF Scales

P Harden

– Carrie Muskat

9/15 Lineup

Milton Bradley was back in the Cubs lineup Tuesday night, batting sixth. Here’s Lou’s order:

SS Theriot

CF Fukudome

1B Lee

3B Ramirez

C Soto

RF Bradley

2B Fontenot

LF Scales

P Zambrano

– Carrie Muskat

9/9 Lineup

Milton Bradley, as expected, was given Wednesday off, and Micah Hoffpauir was starting in right field for the Cubs’ series finale against the Pirates. Here’s the lineup:

CF Fukudome

SS Theriot

1B Lee

RF Hoffpauir

3B Baker

2B Fontenot

LF Scales

C Hill

P Zambrano

– Carrie Muskat

9/8 Bradley out with tightness in legs

Milton Bradley was removed from the lineup Tuesday because of minor tightness in his legs. Bradley had two at-bats in the Cubs’ seven-run first inning against the Pirates, including a single in his first at-bat. The Cubs had planned on giving Bradley Wednesday off, and because of the large lead, decided to pull him early.

– Carrie Muskat

8/29 Baseball Prospectus, then and now

On April 2, Baseball Prospectus projected the Cubs would win 95 games and three-peat in the Central Division. My, how things have changed. In a recent article sorting out the NL teams playoff picture, here’s what Baseball Prospectus had to say re: the Cubs:

“As for the Cubs, there’s no crying in baseball. Projected to be the league’s strongest team, with the corresponding easiest schedule, they’ve instead fallen flat due to a mix of injuries and ineffectiveness in their lineup, with heavy hitters like Milton Bradley, Aramis Ramirez, Alfonso Soriano and Geovany Soto failing to deliver the goods for one reason or another. The meat of their remaining schedule, such as it is, consists of a makeup game with the White Sox and a total of seven games at St. Louis and San Francisco. Meanwhile, they’ve got 20 games remaining against the Brewers, Astros, Reds and Pirates, against whom they’re already a combined 29-15. It’s probably too little, too late to save their season, but as Joaquin Andujar famously said, ‘Youneverknow.’

– Carrie Muskat

8/28 Morning person

Apparently, Milton Bradley is not a morning person. The Cubs outfielder said Friday that he’s had a tough time adjusting to day games at Wrigley Field.

“Strange as it may seem, people don’t understand, you play baseball your whole life and you’re on teams and play mostly night games,” Bradley said after Friday’s 5-2 win over the Mets. “You’re getting up at 2 in the afternoon to come to the field to do whatever you have to do. Here, you have to get up at 8 o’clock in the morning to get ready.

“It’s an adjustment for your body,” he said. “You may be ready for it and say, ‘Oh, I can handle it, I can do that.’ Your body is going to tell you something different. It’s an adjustment to get ready and revved up. This is the Major Leagues, it’s not Spring Training. This counts. It’s an adjustment to get ready to go every day. That’s the only thing I can attribute it, too. I’m doing everything else the same.”

What’s weird is that the stats would say he’s done better under the sun. He has a .232 night time average compared to .288 day, and Bradley was batting .304 at Wrigley compared to .208 on the road.

Since July 12, Bradley was batting .356 with four homers and 11 RBIs at Wrigley. Maybe in the second year of his three-year deal, Bradley will feel more comfortable at home during the day?

“Absolutely,” he said. “Hopefully, I have a terrible spring and come into the season and just go off. I used up all my good hits [this year] in Spring Training.”

– Carrie Muskat

8/28 Be yourself

Koyie Hill was surprised to hear Milton Bradley mention his name and a comment the catcher had made to him because the exchange took place in Spring Training.

When asked Thursday if he had any regrets, Bradley said no. “I’m not going to stop being me,” Bradley said. “Koyie Hill told me if I ever change, he’d kick my [backside], and I ain’t trying to get a foot in my behind.”

Hill remembers the conversation.

“I told him to ‘be yourself’ and not to feel like you can’t get aggravated, or you can’t get mad,” Hill said Friday. “If you throw a helmet every now and then or punch a cooler every now and then — basically my point was ‘Don’t lose your fire just because people are watching. Don’t change your intensity because people are watching.’ That can happen. First time you throw a tantrum, they put it on the front page of the paper and you back off and you’re not the same guy. That’s what I didn’t want.”

The message apparently resonated with Bradley.

“He’s mentioned it to me before during the season,” Hill said. “I know he remembers that.”

– Carrie Muskat

8/27 Chemistry class

Lou Piniella did not want to comment on Milton Bradley’s statement that he prays the games only go nine innings so he can spend the least amount of time possible on the field and then go home. However, Piniella did say this year’s Cubs team has not been one of the better mixes chemistry-wise that he’s had.

First, any reaction to Bradley’s comments?

“I can’t speak for Milton,” Piniella said Thursday.

A reporter said it seems as if Bradley doesn’t want to be with the Cubs.

“He’s getting paid to play,” Piniella said. “I’m getting to paid to put out a lineup and that’s exactly what I’m doing.”

Was Piniella upset to read those comments?

“We’ve had enough problems here with injuries and so forth that we don’t really need any more controversy of any sorts,” Piniella said. “That speaks for itself.”

Back to the issue of chemistry, does winning breed that or do players need to take charge in the clubhouse?

“Winning has a lot to do with chemistry,” Piniella said. “It makes a team come together a lot quicker. I told you all this spring, we had a big turnover. Sometimes it takes a while. It doesn’t necessarily fall in your lap, you know? This hasn’t been one of my better chemistry teams. Look, is that the reason, we’re winning or losing baseball games? No, I don’t think so. You can go beyond that.”

Piniella said the Yankees teams he played on in the late ’70s didn’t have great chemistry off the field, but on the field, they played as a team.

“When you start looking at chemistry, on the field chemistry is the best chemistry you can have,” Piniella said.

Earlier this season, Piniella, who turns 66 on Friday, was criticized by some in the media for losing the fire to manage. He said on Thursday that he’s learned to look the other way over the years.

“I’ve addressed everything that needs to be addressed here,” he said. “I don’t know what else I could do. Look, invariably when things don’t go right it’s always the manager’s fault. You want to blame me? Take your shots. It doesn’t bother me one bit. I’m the same manager I was this year that I was last year that I was the year before. Same manager. No different. When you don’t win, somebody’s got to stand up and be the scapegoat. If you all want to say it’s the manager, say it’s the manager. Fine with me.”

– Carrie Muskat

8/20 Milton & Muppets

Milton Bradley didn’t want to talk after Wednesday’s game, so there’s no telling what was going on between the Cubs outfielder and the fan at PETCO Park who was razzing him during the game.

After Bradley homered, he then made a “talking” sign with his hand as he headed back to the dugout. Lou Piniella called it a “Muppet conversation.”

“You can have a little fun once in a while,” Piniella said, “but you would prefer they concentrate on the game at hand.”

Did Piniella ever have those kind of run-ins with fans?

“On rare occasions, but I had fun with it,” Piniella said. “[Bradley] was having fun with him, more than anything else.”

– Carrie Muskat

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