Results tagged ‘ Nate Schierholtz ’

3/4 Cubs lineup vs A’s

The Cubs play host to the Athletics at Cubs Park in Mesa today with the game scheduled to start at 1:05 p.m. MT. You can listen to Len Kasper and Mick Gillispie on a webcast on Cubs.com. Kyle Hendricks, the Cubs’ Minor League pitcher of the year last year, gets the start. Emilio Bonifacio starts at shortstop in Day 2 without Starlin Castro, sidelined with a mild strain of his right hamstring. Here’s the lineup:

Bonifacio SS
Murphy 3B
Rizzo 1B
Ruggiano LF
Sweeney CF
Wells RF
Schierholtz DH
Barney 2B
Whiteside C

Hendricks P

2/22 Schierholtz OK after collision

Cubs outfielder Nate Schierholtz had a sore jaw and headache after a collision on Friday with Junior Lake during a drill.

“I just got knocked around a little bit out there,” Schierholtz said Saturday. “I didn’t lose consciousness but I saw stars for a second. I took it easy the rest of the day and I feel good today.”

Lake collided with Schierholtz on the right side of his jaw and head. Schierholtz wasn’t exactly certain what body part he collided with, but he did feel it.

“I don’t know what it was,” Schierholtz said. “I don’t remember the play. … Full speed, it’s never a good combo when two guys collide.”

Ironically, this was a drill to work on communication.

“It’s not ideal,” Schierholtz said. “There were almost a couple close calls out there. Next time I’d rather just let the ball drop.”

This is why teams do these drills in Spring Training.

“Exactly,” Schierholtz said.

He was expected to take part in Saturday’s practice but was not part of early work by some of the outfielders.

“I’m fine,” he said. “I feel good, aside from a sore jaw and side of my head.”

– Carrie Muskat

2/21 Schierholtz sidelined after collision

The Cubs’ Nate Schierholtz was sent home as a precautionary measure after a collision in the outfield with Junior Lake during a drill on Friday. Manager Rick Renteria said Schierholtz checked out fine and should be back on Saturday.

The Cubs were doing pop fly drills when the accident happened in shallow right field.

“They were both calling for [the ball], and it sounds like Junior might have gotten him with the back side,” Renteria said. “You’re talking about two strong men.”

Lake converted to outfield late last season, having spent most of his career at third base.

– Carrie Muskat

2/19 Extra bases

* Wednesday was the Cubs’ first full squad workout, which meant it was the first day of live batting practice. Nate Schierholtz got to face exactly who he needed in lefty Travis Wood. Schierholtz is hoping he can convince Cubs manager Rick Renteria to not platoon the outfielder against left-handed pitchers. Last year, Schierholtz batted .262 against right-handers and hit .170 against lefties, part of the reason he had to share right field.

“That’s a huge goal of mine is to play every day and not necessarily platoon as much,” Schierholtz said Wednesday. “That’s one of my big goals this spring.”

* Renteria met with each player on Wednesday, and was impressed by shortstop Starlin Castro, who is coming off a tough year in which he batted a career-low .245.

“He’s very excited,” Renteria said of Castro. “We liked the way he looked in our meeting. He was very happy. We just told him to be himself, expand on his skills and improve his approach at the plate. He spoke a bit more than we did. He has an idea of what he wants to do.”

* Even though Mike Olt’s primary position is third base, he was working out at first on Wednesday on the first day of workouts. The Cubs don’t have a backup first baseman, and top prospects Kris Bryant and Christian Villanueva were sharing third during the session.

* Kyuji Fujikawa, rehabbing from Tommy John surgery on his right elbow, had a long toss session Wednesday, throwing from about 135 feet. He is making progress.

“As long as there is nothing that sets him back, he continues to move forward,” Renteria said.

* Somehow, Blake Parker was aligned with lefties Wesley Wright, James Russell, Tommy Hottovy, Tsuyoshi Wada and Zac Rosscup. Parker is the only right-hander in that group. Did he have to adjust to the southpaws?

“No — I just took my glove off and we did a strictly right-handed shake,” Wright said.

* Besides Wood, Jeff Samardzija, Chris Rusin, Carlos Villanueva and Kyle Hendricks threw live BP sessions on Wednesday.

* Thursday’s workout in Cubs camp will start at the normal time, with stretching at 9:30 a.m. Arizona time.

– Carrie Muskat

1/17 Cubs and Schierholtz

According to ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick, the Cubs have avoided arbitration with outfielder Nate Schierholtz, and signed him to a one-year $5 million contract. Schierholtz is coming off a strong season in which he set personal bests in home runs (21), doubles (32), at-bats (462) and RBIs (68). The outfielder made $2.25 million in 2013, and was projected to get $4.4 million in 2014.

– Carrie Muskat

1/17 Cubs and Valbuena

The Cubs have reportedly reached a contract agreement with infielder Luis Valbuena and avoided arbitration. According to the New York Post’s Joel Sherman, Valbuena has signed a $1.71 million contract with the Cubs. The third baseman is one of eight Cubs who filed for salary arbitration on Tuesday. Figures were to be exchanged today. Arbitration hearings are scheduled for Feb. 1-21.

Valbuena made $930,000 last year, and was projected by MLBTradeRumors.com to receive $1.5 million this year. He appeared in the most games at third base for the Cubs in 2013, batting .218 with 12 home runs and 14 doubles.

Other Cubs who filed for salary arbitration include Jeff Samardzija, Travis Wood, Darwin Barney, Nate Schierholtz, James Russell, Pedro Strop, and Justin Ruggiano. Wood could get the biggest increase. The lefty, who was 9-12 last season, posting career-highs in starts and innings pitched, earned $527,500 in 2013 and was projected to receive $3.6 million this year.

A quick refresher on salary arbitration: Eligible players are those with at least three years of Major League service but less than six years needed to qualify for free agency. If a case goes to a hearing, the player and the team each present their case to a three-member panel.

– Carrie Muskat

11/14 Cubs GM on pitching, Olt & more

The Cubs’ Jed Hoyer talked to reporters in Orlando, Fla., on Wednesday, the last day of the general manager meetings, and discussed a variety of topics. Here is a sample, courtesy of MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch, who was covering the meetings.

Q: What are the Cubs looking for pitching-wise?

HOYER: “I felt like last year, we traded a couple of guys away, but I did feel like if we had a strength on that team, that was probably it. The starters’ ERA and rank in quality starts was pretty good. We’ve done a really good job. We’ve signed guys like [Paul] Maholm and [Scott] Feldman and they’ve come in and got better. We don’t sign those guys looking to trade them. I think we want to have that stability, but I feel that’s a strength of our team, that we can sign guys and they’ll come in and have success.

Q: With pitching, is the emphasis on quality or quantity?

HOYER: “You’re always looking for high quality starting pitching. Everyone wants the guy who can start Game 1 of a playoff series or stop a losing streak. You also know the attrition of a season, it gets ugly. When you don’t have enough depth, that’s when teams really feel the pinch of a lack of pitching. You’re always looking for both but certainly I feel like we’ve worked hard to increase the pitching depth in the system. Maybe that’s slightly less of a concern than it has been in the past.”

Q: What about third baseman Mike Olt?

HOYER: “Mentally, he’s doing well. I think with a prospect like him, this is a guy who was a top 20 prospect. He had a down year and I think in this business, if you try to buy guys at the high point of the market you’re not going to have a lot of success. You need to always be looking for guys that had a down year. Maybe there’s a reason behind it and you can hopefully bounce back. We liked where he was mentally at the end of the year. We’ve been in contact with him. I know he’s working hard on his conditioning. We just hope that he looks back at a long, successful career and 2013 is the nadir.”

Q: Have teams asked about outfielder Nate Schierholtz?

HOYER: “We were proud of Nate. He was a guy that was non-tendered that we signed. He liked our opportunity, he came in and a lot of people asked about him in-season. We chose to hold on to him. That interest remains, but give him a lot of credit. I think he proved to a lot of people that he is an everyday player. He did that through hard work.

Q: What would be a successful Cubs season?

HOYER: “I always define it the same way. You want to win, but I think where we are as an organization, you want to be closer to the World Series. Closer to that team that is a sustained winner that comes to Spring Training every year with a chance. I think if we’re a lot closer when we’re talking next year, wherever these meetings are, then it was a good season. If we move that forward, obviously you can never answer that question without talking about winning. You want to win in the big leagues. But we also want to move our timetable closer to being the organization that we want to be.”

Q: Will the Cubs’ top prospects get to the Majors in 2014?

HOYER: “There’s a chance. We also want to be patient. The last thing we want to do is short-circuit their careers or harm them long-term by rushing them. I think when they’re ready, we’ll bring them up. It’s nice that they’re a year closer. Hopefully next year at this time, they’re one year closer and in Wrigley pretty soon.”

– Carrie Muskat

9/29 Final notebook

* Anthony Rizzo doubled in his first at-bat in the first to become the first Cubs left-handed hitter to reach 40 doubles since Mark Grace had 41 doubles in 2000. Rizzo finished with 65 extra-base hits this season, the most by a Cubs left-handed hitter since Mark Grace had that many in 1999.

“I’m going to take a lot of positives out of this year,” Rizzo said. “The only thing people are going to ride me on is the average but things could’ve been different there. Things didn’t go my way sometimes but that’s the game of baseball. I’m not happy about that at all but I’m going into the offseason pretty confident I can hit .300 and do all the other things as well.”

Rizzo, who finished with a .233 average in his first full season, and Nate Schierholtz (32 doubles) are the first Cubs left-handed hitting teammates to each reach 30 doubles in the same season since Jacque Jones (32 doubles) and Juan Pierre (31 doubles) in 2006.

In May, Rizzo signed a seven-year, $41 million contract extension. That didn’t affect his hitting.

“One of the goals at the beginning of this year and it was the same last year was to be the starting first baseman for the Cubs,” Rizzo said. “Obviously, now it’ll be for a few more years. Like I said when I signed it, it’s security. I get to play baseball and don’t have to worry about anything else except playing baseball.”

* Shortstop Starlin Castro totaled 666 at-bats, tops in the National League. Baltimore’s Manny Machado led the Majors with 667 at-bats.

* The Cubs finished 25-51 against the NL Central, matching the Astros for the lowest winning percentage by any team in its own division. Chicago went 7-12 against St. Louis, 5-14 against Cincinnati, 6-13 against Milwaukee, and 7-12 against Pittsburgh. It’s the first time they’ve finished with double-digit losses against four teams since 2002.

– Carrie Muskat

9/23 Pirates 2, Cubs 1

For the second straight day, champagne was sprayed at Wrigley Field, and once again, it was on the visitor’s side. One day after the Braves clinched the NL East title, the Cubs watched the Pirates party as they secured their first playoff berth since 1992 with a 2-1 win Monday night.

“It’s a tough one to lose after coming back like that,” said Dale Sveum, whose team tied the game in the eighth on pinch-hitter Donnie Murphy’s RBI single.

Starling Marte smacked a tiebreaking solo home run with two outs in the ninth off Kevin Gregg to lift the Pirates to victory but it took a close play at the plate to clinch it. Marte had entered in the seventh as a defensive replacement in left field, and his at-bat in the ninth was his first of the game. He launched a 2-2 pitch from Gregg into the left-field bleachers. Marte’s last two home runs have come off Gregg in the ninth; he also connected July 7 on a homer that tied the game.

The Cubs tried to answer in the ninth. With one out and one on, Nate Schierholtz reached on a fielder’s choice, and Ryan Sweeney then singled into the gap in right center. Schierholtz was thrown out at home on an 8-3-2 relay.

Schierholtz has played in a World Series, doing so with the Giants in 2010.

“It brought back some memories,” Schierholtz said of watching the Braves, then the Pirates. “That’s why we play this game. It’s pretty exciting being in the postseason and I obviously want to get back there one day.”

Jeff Samardzija, who also knows about championship seasons, having played football at Notre Dame, had talked to Schierholtz after Sunday’s game.

“We mentioned to each other that’s what it’s all about, that’s why you work in the offseason, that’s why you work hard in Spring Training, that’s why you want to get off to a fast start in April and May so you can have those moments,” Samardzija said. “That’s what you want. If you’re just here just to play until next year, that’s not what it’s all about. You have to let it all hang out and you have to play for right now. That’s what we need to do.

“I think we’re getting there,” Samardzija said, “but I think we need to get some things ironed out and get this team mentally in a spot where that’s what we’re shooting for, and we’re not shooting to survive but we’re shooting to win and thrive out there.”

The Pirates needed to beat the Cubs and have the Cardinals beat the Nationals to secure a playoff spot, and the Cards won, 4-3. Samardzija tried to delay having to watch their fun in his career-high 32nd start. He did serve up Neil Walker’s home run on a 1-1 fastball with one out in the first, but that was really the only hard hit ball.

This was his fifth start against the Pirates this season, including Opening Day, when he threw eight shutout innings. That was his only win against Pittsburgh this year.

“They’re aggressive,” Samardzija said. “They’ve seen me a lot and know I throw a lot of fastballs early in the count. You could tell when one was in the zone, they were hacking. I threw a couple cutters early which kept them off balance. It’s the fifth, sixth time I’ve faced them this year. You have to keep adjusting to what you’re doing against them.”

The Cubs dropped to 30-49 at home, and have two games left at Wrigley Field. They’ve never lost 50 games at home in a single season.

– Carrie Muskat

9/19 Cubs 5, Brewers 1

Jake Arrieta’s extended audition for the Cubs’ 2014 rotation went very well Thursday. Nate Schierholtz hit a two-run homer and Luis Valbuena and Brian Bogusevic each added solo shots to back Arrieta, who gave up three hits over seven innings in the Cubs’ 5-1 victory over the Brewers at Miller Park, snapping a five-game losing streak.

Acquired from the Orioles in July in the Scott Feldman deal, Arrieta walked leadoff batter Norichika Aoki, then retired 11 straight before Aramis Ramirez singled with two outs in the fourth. The right-hander retired the next seven batters he faced before Carlos Gomez spoiled the shutout bid with a leadoff home run in the seventh on an 0-1 pitch. Two outs later, Jeff Bianchi doubled for the third hit off Arrieta.

“Everything was working really really well,” Dale Sveum said of the outing by Arrieta. “He hung one cutter to Gomez, but other than that, there was weak contact. … That was a pretty impressive outing.”

This was Arrieta’s eighth start with the Cubs, and it was his longest outing since he threw seven shutout innings against the Cardinals on Aug. 16.

“He was throwing filthy stuff,” Gomez said of the right-hander. “The fastball was explosive, had good sink. He commanded the curve really good. He’s got good stuff. I don’t know why he was never more successful most of his career. This guy’s going to be good.”

The emphasis was on keeping the ball down and having command of his pitches.

“I told [pitching coach Chris Bosio] after the game, I feel like I just threw my pre-game ‘pen, and I could’ve gone another 100 pitches, that’s how good I felt today as far as controling the game and my effort,” Arrieta said.

The knock on the right-hander has been a lack of command but he not only showed he could control his cutter/slider and two-seam fastball but also had a good curveball.

“You have to get that [command] established as early as possible and not allow hitters to eliminate pitches and today they weren’t able to do that,” Arrieta said. “You saw a lot of below average swings and a lot of guys were just off balance and not able to anticipate what I was coming at them with. That’s one of the big things I have to do as a starter to try to pitch deep in the games is keep them off balance and get them to pitch to contact early.”

– Carrie Muskat

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